FIRE STOPPING
A firestopping is a fire protection system made of various components used to seal openings and joints in fire-resistance rated wall and/or floor assemblies. Firestopping are designed to restore the fire-resistance ratings of wall and/or floor assemblies by impeding the spread of fire by filling the openings with fire-resistant materials. Unprotected openings in fire separations cancel out the fire-resistance ratings of the fire separations, allowing the spread of fire, usually past the limits of the fire safety plan of a building. Firestopping components include intumescents, cementitious mortars, silicone, firestop pillows, mineral fibers, and rubber compounds. Firestopping should be maintained in accordance with the listing, approval use, and compliance. Construction documentation sometimes includes an inventory of all firestopping in a building, with drawings indicating location and the certification listings of each firestop. Using this, a building owner can meet the requirements of the fire code related to fire barriers during the period of building occupation. Otherwise, improper repairs may result, which would violate the fire code, and could allow a fire to travel between areas intended by code to be separated during a fire event. Firestopping components include intumescents, cementitious mortars, silicone, firestop pillows, mineral fibers, and rubber compounds. Opening Types • Electrical through-penetrations • Mechanical through-penetrations • Structural through-penetrations • Unpenetrated openings (openings for future use for example) • Re-entries of existing firestops • Control or sway joints within fire-resistance rated wall or floor assemblies • Junctions between fire-resistance rated wall or floor assemblies • "Head-of-wall" (HOW) joints, where non-load bearing wall assemblies meet floor assemblies